Latest Case Studies
Case Study Sustainability Entrepreneurship
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles (Abridged, French translation)
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deep…
3rd prize in the 2022 HEC CSR Challenge case writing competition
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles (Abridged, French translation)
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Summary
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deeply rooted values, shared with many in the valley. Opaline was her experiment to prove to the world that a different type of capitalism was possible, one that put human and environmental aspects where they belonged – at the epicenter of a business revolution. De Meyer had regularly been asked in interviews why Opaline was not trying to grow faster, rather than ensuring that its existing suppliers and distributors developed alongside the company. She always replied by drawing an analogy with a growing forest, in which no tree stood much higher than the others or else it would fall, alone, with the next storm. The analogy proved robust but now a more violent storm – a global pandemic – was brewing that was hurting everyone at once. What would it mean for all the projects the team had set out for 2020? And more fundamentally, could Opaline weather this storm as it had already done several times thanks to its strong ecosystem of partners? Would it pay the price for not having extended its roots deep enough when it could?
3rd prize in the 2022 HEC CSR Challenge case writing competition
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Opaline
Industry Consumer Goods, Food and Beverage
Language French
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Case Study Sustainability Entrepreneurship
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles (Abridged)
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deep…
3rd prize in the 2022 HEC CSR Challenge case writing competition
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles (Abridged)
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Summary
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deeply rooted values, shared with many in the valley. Opaline was her experiment to prove to the world that a different type of capitalism was possible, one that put human and environmental aspects where they belonged – at the epicenter of a business revolution. De Meyer had regularly been asked in interviews why Opaline was not trying to grow faster, rather than ensuring that its existing suppliers and distributors developed alongside the company. She always replied by drawing an analogy with a growing forest, in which no tree stood much higher than the others or else it would fall, alone, with the next storm. The analogy proved robust but now a more violent storm – a global pandemic – was brewing that was hurting everyone at once. What would it mean for all the projects the team had set out for 2020? And more fundamentally, could Opaline weather this storm as it had already done several times thanks to its strong ecosystem of partners? Would it pay the price for not having extended its roots deep enough when it could?
3rd prize in the 2022 HEC CSR Challenge case writing competition
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Opaline
Industry Consumer Goods, Food and Beverage
Language English
Contact

Research Information & Knowledge Hub for additional information on IMD publications

Case Study Sustainability Entrepreneurship
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deep…
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Summary
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deeply rooted values, shared with many in the valley. Opaline was her experiment to prove to the world that a different type of capitalism was possible, one that put human and environmental aspects where they belonged – at the epicenter of a business revolution. De Meyer had regularly been asked in interviews why Opaline was not trying to grow faster, rather than ensuring that its existing suppliers and distributors developed alongside the company. She always replied by drawing an analogy with a growing forest, in which no tree stood much higher than the others or else it would fall, alone, with the next storm. The analogy proved robust but now a more violent storm – a global pandemic – was brewing that was hurting everyone at once. What would it mean for all the projects the team had set out for 2020? And more fundamentally, could Opaline weather this storm as it had already done several times thanks to its strong ecosystem of partners? Would it pay the price for not having extended its roots deep enough when it could?
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Opaline
Industry Consumer Goods, Food and Beverage
Language English
Contact

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Case Study Digital Global Business Operations Sustainability
Henkel: Driving sustainability through digital
Henkel, a 145-year-old family business, had unintentionally started its digital transformation journey in 2013. Only a few years later it had reached such a level of digital maturity that digital became a decisive element of the company’s strategic framework and one of the key drivers to achieve growth. In less than ten years, Henkel received in…
By Carlos Cordon and Edwin Wellian
©2022
Henkel: Driving sustainability through digital
By Carlos Cordon and Edwin Wellian
©2022
Summary
Henkel, a 145-year-old family business, had unintentionally started its digital transformation journey in 2013. Only a few years later it had reached such a level of digital maturity that digital became a decisive element of the company’s strategic framework and one of the key drivers to achieve growth. In less than ten years, Henkel received international recognition as a global leader in using Industry 4.0 technologies to transform factories, value chains and business models. The first part looks at how this journey started, what it had to do to reach this impressive level of digital competence and to make the journey self-sustaining. Can Henkel also build on the success of this digital transformation to make its products carbon-neutral during production and consumption? This is the question that will be explored during the second part. Henkel had made good progress to reduce its own operational CO2 emissions, but realized that this represented less than 5% of the total. Two-thirds occurred during consumption and one-third during the production of raw materials. Making a 50,000+ workforce and operations digitally savvy is one thing, but reducing carbon-emissions at stages of the process over which Henkel had no direct control is something else. The dilemma facing Henkel was where it should focus on to reduce its overall CO2 emissions. Should it continue to prioritize making its own production sites carbon-free, in the knowledge that this represents only a fraction of the total emissions, or should it prioritize making its products carbon-free in the other parts of the value chain where the impact on our planet is higher? Prioritizing the latter would make sense, but what could Henkel actually do to change the attitudes and behaviors of thousands of suppliers and hundreds of millions of consumers?
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Henkel
Industry Consumer Goods;Manufacturing, Chemicals
Language English
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Case Study Sustainability Diversity and Equity and Inclusion
OCP: Liberating energy to create sustainable growth
The case focuses on the transformation of OCP, a state-owned monopoly that mined and exploited Morocco’s phosphate reserves. By 2021 it had become an organization with a mission to contribute to the sustainability of food security as the custodians of 70% of the world’s phosphate reserves. Phosphate is one of three vital ingredients in fertilize…
OCP: Liberating energy to create sustainable growth
Summary
The case focuses on the transformation of OCP, a state-owned monopoly that mined and exploited Morocco’s phosphate reserves. By 2021 it had become an organization with a mission to contribute to the sustainability of food security as the custodians of 70% of the world’s phosphate reserves. Phosphate is one of three vital ingredients in fertilizers that are used to grow healthy, drought-resistant plants, and contributes to sustainable agriculture. This is nowhere more urgent than in Africa: sub-Saharan Africa has the world’s fastest-growing population, but an impoverished agricultural system and only one-third of its arable land is cultivated. Helping smallholder farmers to cultivate more land with robust crops could improve the continent’s sustainable agriculture and better feed its population. In 2016 OCP Group’s Chairman, Dr Mostafa Terrab, launched “the Movement,” a vaguely defined initiative to “liberate energy” and develop collective intelligence to build a more purposeful sustainable future. The Movement’s goal was to continue the group’s transformation from a hierarchical phosphate producer to a global, digital and learning organization with a mission to create sustainable growth for everyone. The case describes the Movement’s philosophy, intention and principles: self-organization, an advice process, and collective intelligence based on a shared vision that all people can contribute to the organization and its ecosystem through collaboration. The Movement brings people together to anticipate future challenges and stakeholder expectations and to bring innovative ideas to life. By 2019, the Movement had launched 60 projects involving 9,000 people that have diversified the group’s business activities, enhanced the employee experience, created growth opportunities and community engagement in Morocco and across Africa. Several of these projects have been anchored into the Group and have increased its focus on inclusive business and sustainable development.
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization OCP Africa
Industry Manufacturing, Chemicals
Language English
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Case Study Strategy General Management
Diga: How to excel at strategy execution (Part B)
On the evening of Friday 14 December 2021, Valeria Schmidt was driving home from Diga’s headquarters. It had been an intense week, as the company had just released its “Strategy 2027.” Valeria had become CEO of the company at the beginning of 2021, so the new strategy was the outcome of the work of the top management team she had appointed soon …
Diga: How to excel at strategy execution (Part B)
Summary
On the evening of Friday 14 December 2021, Valeria Schmidt was driving home from Diga’s headquarters. It had been an intense week, as the company had just released its “Strategy 2027.” Valeria had become CEO of the company at the beginning of 2021, so the new strategy was the outcome of the work of the top management team she had appointed soon after her arrival. Valeria knew it was a critical moment for the company, and the board had given their full support to implement the strategy. Profitable growth was a priority, and she felt the urgency to launch the key strategic initiatives with the right approach. Strategy execution had to happen smoothly. As much as she sensed the great opportunities that lay ahead for Diga, she was also aware of the many challenges that would come during the implementation phase of Strategy 2027. As Valeria negotiated the traffic, her mind kept returning to some of the questions that had been raised earlier that afternoon during the top management team meeting: Which strategic initiatives should she prioritize to achieve the objectives set? How should she secure their successful implementation?
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Diga
Industry Manufacturing, Coating
Language English
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Case Study Strategy General Management
Diga: How to excel at strategy execution (Part A)
On the evening of Friday 14 December 2021, Valeria Schmidt was driving home from Diga’s headquarters. It had been an intense week, as the company had just released its “Strategy 2027.” Valeria had become CEO of the company at the beginning of 2021, so the new strategy was the outcome of the work of the top management team she had appointed soon …
Diga: How to excel at strategy execution (Part A)
Summary
On the evening of Friday 14 December 2021, Valeria Schmidt was driving home from Diga’s headquarters. It had been an intense week, as the company had just released its “Strategy 2027.” Valeria had become CEO of the company at the beginning of 2021, so the new strategy was the outcome of the work of the top management team she had appointed soon after her arrival. Valeria knew it was a critical moment for the company, and the board had given their full support to implement the strategy. Profitable growth was a priority, and she felt the urgency to launch the key strategic initiatives with the right approach. Strategy execution had to happen smoothly. As much as she sensed the great opportunities that lay ahead for Diga, she was also aware of the many challenges that would come during the implementation phase of Strategy 2027. As Valeria negotiated the traffic, her mind kept returning to some of the questions that had been raised earlier that afternoon during the top management team meeting: Which strategic initiatives should she prioritize to achieve the objectives set? How should she secure their successful implementation?
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Diga
Industry Manufacturing, Coating
Language English
Contact

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Case Study Strategy General Management
Diga: How to excel at strategy execution (Main case)
On the evening of Friday 14 December 2021, Valeria Schmidt was driving home from Diga’s headquarters. It had been an intense week, as the company had just released its “Strategy 2027.” Valeria had become CEO of the company at the beginning of 2021, so the new strategy was the outcome of the work of the top management team she had appointed soon …
Diga: How to excel at strategy execution (Main case)
Summary
On the evening of Friday 14 December 2021, Valeria Schmidt was driving home from Diga’s headquarters. It had been an intense week, as the company had just released its “Strategy 2027.” Valeria had become CEO of the company at the beginning of 2021, so the new strategy was the outcome of the work of the top management team she had appointed soon after her arrival. Valeria knew it was a critical moment for the company, and the board had given their full support to implement the strategy. Profitable growth was a priority, and she felt the urgency to launch the key strategic initiatives with the right approach. Strategy execution had to happen smoothly. As much as she sensed the great opportunities that lay ahead for Diga, she was also aware of the many challenges that would come during the implementation phase of Strategy 2027. As Valeria negotiated the traffic, her mind kept returning to some of the questions that had been raised earlier that afternoon during the top management team meeting: Which strategic initiatives should she prioritize to achieve the objectives set? How should she secure their successful implementation?
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Diga
Industry Manufacturing, Coating
Language English
Contact

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Case Study Operations Supply Chain Digital
Zalando: A digital foundation for fashion supply chain success
By 2021 Zalando had become Europe’s largest pure player in online fashion. But the road to success had not always been smooth. Back in 2014, six years after it was founded, the Germany-based company was at a crossroads. With an impending initial public offering (IPO) and investors looking for results, the company was nowhere near being profitabl…
By Richard Markoff David Schröder Arnd Huchzermeier and Ralf W. Seifert
©2022
Zalando: A digital foundation for fashion supply chain success
By Richard Markoff David Schröder Arnd Huchzermeier and Ralf W. Seifert
©2022
Summary
By 2021 Zalando had become Europe’s largest pure player in online fashion. But the road to success had not always been smooth. Back in 2014, six years after it was founded, the Germany-based company was at a crossroads. With an impending initial public offering (IPO) and investors looking for results, the company was nowhere near being profitable. Zalando realized that to achieve profitability and market leadership, it would have to leverage advanced technology and develop a data-driven supply chain. So, with the innovative spirit of a start-up, it embraced the challenge of building internal digital tools and competencies to drive supply chain efficiencies. The online fashion supply chain had to wrestle with the same challenges of tight margins and high customer expectations familiar to all online retailers. However, the fashion industry faced other unique challenges – high SKU counts, high seasonality, relentless product turnover and frighteningly elevated return rates. By developing proprietary systems and machine learning tools, Zalando developed a responsive, flexible distribution network, trustworthy order promises and a sophisticated, holistic approach to returns management. Through a data-driven journey born out of a crisis, Zalando discovered that these capabilities not only delivered supply chain excellence and pioneering new innovative techniques but also helped to fulfill the company’s vision of providing endless choice, seamless convenience and a tailored digital experience to millions of customers across Europe.
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Zalando
Industry Information Technology, eCommerce;Consumer Goods, Apparel and Fashion
Language English
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Case Study Digital Disruption Human Resources Sustainability
Automobili Lamborghini: Future-proofing an iconic luxury brand
Throughout its 60-year history, luxury carmaker Lamborghini had been consistently visionary, innovative and inspiring. Bold entrepreneurial moves – such as bringing the attributes of a racing car to mainstream, non-racing vehicles, or pioneering a luxury SUV – became an intrinsic part of the company’s DNA. Yet, entering the 2020s, the unfolding …
By Stéphane J. G. Girod and Martin Králik
©2022
Automobili Lamborghini: Future-proofing an iconic luxury brand
By Stéphane J. G. Girod and Martin Králik
©2022
Summary
Throughout its 60-year history, luxury carmaker Lamborghini had been consistently visionary, innovative and inspiring. Bold entrepreneurial moves – such as bringing the attributes of a racing car to mainstream, non-racing vehicles, or pioneering a luxury SUV – became an intrinsic part of the company’s DNA. Yet, entering the 2020s, the unfolding social, geopolitical, environmental and industrial transitions presented luxury players, including auto companies, with monumental challenges. Sustainability – and, in the car sector, electrification – came to define the new decade. In an effort to push for net-zero climate-change targets, between 2021 and 2022 EU legislators announced a virtual ban on the sale of traditional combustion engines past the year 2035. Future-proofing the organization for the challenges ahead required (i) reinventing the iconic brand so that it remained desirable in what will be a radically different automotive space, based on sustainability targets, new materials, and digital technologies; (ii) shifting the workforce composition and culture from one that was firmly rooted in engineering, precision, and a parochial, heads-down, male-dominated outlook to one that emphasized cross-functionality, diversity of backgrounds, curiosity, hyperawareness, and shared organizational and social values; and (iii) maintaining a position of thought, industry, technological and innovation leadership, alongside the timeless quality of the made-in-Italy label, at a time when customers as well as society at large are looking to global brands to come up with a renewed, compelling vision of purposeful luxury.
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Automobili Lamborghini
Industry Consumer Goods, Luxury Goods and Jewelery;Automotive, Automobiles;Automotive
Language English
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Case Study Digital Disruption Operations
HEINEKEN: Building the connected brewery
HEINEKEN, one the world’s largest breweries, had led a long and successful effort to improve the efficiency of its brewery network. For the company COO, this was a source of pride, and also a challenge and an opportunity. Long curious about the potential for digitalizing the supply chain, perhaps this was the natural entry point for the company…
By Ralf W. Seifert and Richard Markoff
©2022
HEINEKEN: Building the connected brewery
By Ralf W. Seifert and Richard Markoff
©2022
Summary
HEINEKEN, one the world’s largest breweries, had led a long and successful effort to improve the efficiency of its brewery network. For the company COO, this was a source of pride, and also a challenge and an opportunity. Long curious about the potential for digitalizing the supply chain, perhaps this was the natural entry point for the company’s supply chain to create a digital transformation program. HEINEKEN could continue its productivity efforts by leveraging digital technologies. Starting by bringing in digital natives from the outside and identifying key internal stakeholders ready to innovate, HEINEKEN began a process of initial pilots where those that were willing could experiment, fail fast, build on successes, and build a digital culture. Through some breakthroughs use cases and financial return prioritization, the company overcame internal resistance, found their way to a model that didn’t demand standardization, allowed local innovation and ownership and built a digital community that acted like a tech start-up as much as a brewing company.
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Heineken
Industry Consumer Goods, Beer;Consumer Goods
Language English
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Case Study Family Business Sustainability Strategy Diversity and Equity and Inclusion
Firmenich: Juggling the short and the long term
Formatted like a comic-strip, this case showcases how Firmenich achieved resilience and strong sustainability commitments thanks to its family ownership. The case investigates how family ownership spanning across four generations and 125 years, has influenced the company’s core values and brought a long-term perspective to its strategy, which al…
By Sameh Abadir and Marta Widz
©2022
Firmenich: Juggling the short and the long term
By Sameh Abadir and Marta Widz
©2022
Summary
Formatted like a comic-strip, this case showcases how Firmenich achieved resilience and strong sustainability commitments thanks to its family ownership. The case investigates how family ownership spanning across four generations and 125 years, has influenced the company’s core values and brought a long-term perspective to its strategy, which allowed sustainability, diversity, and inclusion on the executives’ agenda many decades before its peers. The case concludes by illustrating how these core foundational values allowed Firmenich to weather the COVID-19 storm by prompting the organization to react very rapidly, in a display of strong resilience. Firmenich is the winner of the 2019 IMD-Pictet Sustainability in Family Business Award.
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Firmenich
Industry Consumer Goods, Cosmetics and Perfumes;Consumer Goods, Food and Beverage
Language English
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Case Study Supply Chain General Management Operations
Wistful cosmetics: Designing supply chain resilience
This disguised case exercise presents the situation confronting Wistful Cosmetics, a cosmetics company based in Spain. The company, like many others, has been shaken by disruptions to global supply chains. Among the most prominent events are Covid, the Suez Canal blockage by the Ever Given container ship, the global capacity crisis in logistics …
By Ralf W. Seifert and Richard Markoff
©2022
Wistful cosmetics: Designing supply chain resilience
By Ralf W. Seifert and Richard Markoff
©2022
Summary
This disguised case exercise presents the situation confronting Wistful Cosmetics, a cosmetics company based in Spain. The company, like many others, has been shaken by disruptions to global supply chains. Among the most prominent events are Covid, the Suez Canal blockage by the Ever Given container ship, the global capacity crisis in logistics infrastructure, and unprecedent spikes in demand. The case describes Wistful’s context and structure and challenges the reader to respond to three questions: what does the term ‘supply chain resilience’ mean?, what sorts of events would fall under this definition?, and what steps should Wistful’s supply chain director recommend, with what anticipated impacts on the operations and business model.
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Language English
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Case Study Strategy Entrepreneurship Marketing Innovation
Roasting plant coffee: From engineer’s dream to customer’s delight
Our story starts in 2001. Mike Caswell, an engineer and early Starbuck’s employee, creates a technology that permits better flavor and increased margins, for fresh-roasted coffee in retail stores. Years of engineering and fundraising, franchising, disputes, hopes and frustrations ensue. Jamie Robertson joins in 2017, as both investor and CEO …
By Jim Pulcrano John Huffman Luiz Felipe Kossmann de Menezes Pablo Cadaval Santos Rodrigo Paupitz Bhevan Chandrasena Ivan Breiter Felipe Elink Schuurman and Markus Masseli
©2022
Roasting plant coffee: From engineer’s dream to customer’s delight
By Jim Pulcrano John Huffman Luiz Felipe Kossmann de Menezes Pablo Cadaval Santos Rodrigo Paupitz Bhevan Chandrasena Ivan Breiter Felipe Elink Schuurman and Markus Masseli
©2022
Summary
Our story starts in 2001. Mike Caswell, an engineer and early Starbuck’s employee, creates a technology that permits better flavor and increased margins, for fresh-roasted coffee in retail stores. Years of engineering and fundraising, franchising, disputes, hopes and frustrations ensue. Jamie Robertson joins in 2017, as both investor and CEO of a new unit in the UK and opens a store in London. The Covid pandemic hits, but Jamie perseveres, as he has realized that it is the customer experience that will make the difference. Jamie and his team open additional stores in London, Jamie is named CEO of the group, and eventually they are successful in raising significant funds for expansion in the UK and the US.
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Roasting Plant
Industry Consumer Goods, Coffee;Consumer Services, Retail
Language English
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Case Study Business to Business Pricing Strategy Marketing
Bhanton Towels: The pricing dilemma of an exporter
In April 2022, Bhanton Towels (Bhanton), an export-oriented company in the Philippines, received an order from AliTex Enterprises (AliTex), China. One of Bhanton’s major customers in Europe had just cancelled an order for 200 metric tons (MT) of towels because of the Ukraine-Russia conflict. Since the conflict was a case of “force majeure,” the …
By Dominique Turpin Maria Theresa Manalac Shweta Pandey and Sandeep Puri
©2022
Bhanton Towels: The pricing dilemma of an exporter
By Dominique Turpin Maria Theresa Manalac Shweta Pandey and Sandeep Puri
©2022
Summary
In April 2022, Bhanton Towels (Bhanton), an export-oriented company in the Philippines, received an order from AliTex Enterprises (AliTex), China. One of Bhanton’s major customers in Europe had just cancelled an order for 200 metric tons (MT) of towels because of the Ukraine-Russia conflict. Since the conflict was a case of “force majeure,” the cancellation terms could not be negotiated. These two events presented Bhanton’s management with a major dilemma; the company needed additional orders to achieve its monthly production targets of 2,000 MT for May and June 2022. However, the low price requested for the order from AliTex could potentially have a long-term impact on the company’s profitability and reputation in the market. It might also affect its relationship with key accounts like Walmart in the US and IKEA and Sainsbury’s (in Europe) if they were to hear of it. AliTex offered Bhanton an opportunity to enter new markets like Australia, Canada, China and New Zealand. Could the company sell its towels at ₱190 per kg to AliTex. And if not, what was the minimum possible rate? The company was also exploring other potential sales and customer acquisition strategies to increase its monthly sales volume by 1,000 MT and reduce dependence on retail customers.
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Bhanton Towels
Industry Manufacturing, Textile
Language English
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