Entrepreneurship
Latest Case Studies
Case Study Sustainability Entrepreneurship
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles (Abridged, French translation)
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deep…
3rd prize in the 2022 HEC CSR Challenge case writing competition
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles (Abridged, French translation)
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Summary
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deeply rooted values, shared with many in the valley. Opaline was her experiment to prove to the world that a different type of capitalism was possible, one that put human and environmental aspects where they belonged – at the epicenter of a business revolution. De Meyer had regularly been asked in interviews why Opaline was not trying to grow faster, rather than ensuring that its existing suppliers and distributors developed alongside the company. She always replied by drawing an analogy with a growing forest, in which no tree stood much higher than the others or else it would fall, alone, with the next storm. The analogy proved robust but now a more violent storm – a global pandemic – was brewing that was hurting everyone at once. What would it mean for all the projects the team had set out for 2020? And more fundamentally, could Opaline weather this storm as it had already done several times thanks to its strong ecosystem of partners? Would it pay the price for not having extended its roots deep enough when it could?
3rd prize in the 2022 HEC CSR Challenge case writing competition
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Opaline
Industry Consumer Goods, Food and Beverage
Language French
Contact

Research Information & Knowledge Hub for additional information on IMD publications

Case Study Sustainability Entrepreneurship
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles (Abridged)
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deep…
3rd prize in the 2022 HEC CSR Challenge case writing competition
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles (Abridged)
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Summary
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deeply rooted values, shared with many in the valley. Opaline was her experiment to prove to the world that a different type of capitalism was possible, one that put human and environmental aspects where they belonged – at the epicenter of a business revolution. De Meyer had regularly been asked in interviews why Opaline was not trying to grow faster, rather than ensuring that its existing suppliers and distributors developed alongside the company. She always replied by drawing an analogy with a growing forest, in which no tree stood much higher than the others or else it would fall, alone, with the next storm. The analogy proved robust but now a more violent storm – a global pandemic – was brewing that was hurting everyone at once. What would it mean for all the projects the team had set out for 2020? And more fundamentally, could Opaline weather this storm as it had already done several times thanks to its strong ecosystem of partners? Would it pay the price for not having extended its roots deep enough when it could?
3rd prize in the 2022 HEC CSR Challenge case writing competition
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Opaline
Industry Consumer Goods, Food and Beverage
Language English
Contact

Research Information & Knowledge Hub for additional information on IMD publications

Case Study Sustainability Entrepreneurship
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deep…
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Summary
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deeply rooted values, shared with many in the valley. Opaline was her experiment to prove to the world that a different type of capitalism was possible, one that put human and environmental aspects where they belonged – at the epicenter of a business revolution. De Meyer had regularly been asked in interviews why Opaline was not trying to grow faster, rather than ensuring that its existing suppliers and distributors developed alongside the company. She always replied by drawing an analogy with a growing forest, in which no tree stood much higher than the others or else it would fall, alone, with the next storm. The analogy proved robust but now a more violent storm – a global pandemic – was brewing that was hurting everyone at once. What would it mean for all the projects the team had set out for 2020? And more fundamentally, could Opaline weather this storm as it had already done several times thanks to its strong ecosystem of partners? Would it pay the price for not having extended its roots deep enough when it could?
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Opaline
Industry Consumer Goods, Food and Beverage
Language English
Contact

Research Information & Knowledge Hub for additional information on IMD publications

Case Study Strategy Entrepreneurship Marketing Innovation
Roasting plant coffee: From engineer’s dream to customer’s delight
Our story starts in 2001. Mike Caswell, an engineer and early Starbuck’s employee, creates a technology that permits better flavor and increased margins, for fresh-roasted coffee in retail stores. Years of engineering and fundraising, franchising, disputes, hopes and frustrations ensue. Jamie Robertson joins in 2017, as both investor and CEO …
By Jim Pulcrano John Huffman Luiz Felipe Kossmann de Menezes Pablo Cadaval Santos Rodrigo Paupitz Bhevan Chandrasena Ivan Breiter Felipe Elink Schuurman and Markus Masseli
©2022
Case Study Business to Business Digital Disruption Strategy General Management Marketing Entrepreneurship Customer Centricity
Sascar: The five next years
When SASCAR was acquired by Michelin in 2014, it was barely staying afloat, selling telematic services on price. The case describes how the new CEO and CMO turned SASCAR around in five years. Without explicitly referring to it, they used customer-centric principles: they focused on customer benefits (value conception), achieved buy-in from custo…
By Frédéric Dalsace
©2022
Sascar: The five next years
By Frédéric Dalsace
©2022
Summary
When SASCAR was acquired by Michelin in 2014, it was barely staying afloat, selling telematic services on price. The case describes how the new CEO and CMO turned SASCAR around in five years. Without explicitly referring to it, they used customer-centric principles: they focused on customer benefits (value conception), achieved buy-in from customers and third parties (value delivery) and got beyond the fixed-pie mindset (value capture). The results were startling: despite the growing competition, SASCAR evolved from a money losing, “me-too” local fleet management firm into a profitable leader in a growing market. The case goes on to discuss issues that the company will need to address, including performance-based business models, a branding strategy, international expansion and relations with Michelin.
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Sascar
Industry Manufacturing, Technology;Logistics and Supply Chain, Transportation
Language English
Contact

Research Information & Knowledge Hub for additional information on IMD publications

Case Study Digital Disruption Entrepreneurship Strategy Start-up Advertising Social Media Sustainability
Largo.ai in Hollywood: Good enough?
The case tells the story of Sami Arpa a young entrepreneur with a passion for the movie industry. Sami Arpa and his start-up Largo leverage technology to improve the movie industry. Largo launched in 2018 with the platform for short films called Sofy.tv. In 2020 Largo launches its own SaaS B2B platform providing an AI algorithm for the film-maki…
By Jim Pulcrano Laure Frank Désirée Gilgen Konrad Meyer and Federico Paparella
©2022
Case Study Sustainability Entrepreneurship Strategy Supply Chain Diversity and Equity and Inclusion
Lionheart Farms (Philippines) and the tree of life
Lionheart Agrotech Limited, the holding company of Lionheart Farms is developing a large-scale sustainable hybrid coconut plantation with integrated processing and manufacturing capacities in the Philippines. The case describes the idea of the founders, their journey, the challenges they met and how they solved them. The case explores the key c…
By Benoit F. Leleux Anna Ziolkovska Jose Mora Said Chekri and Thibaud de Veyrac
©2022
Case Study Entrepreneurship Strategy China Sustainability
Transforming Geely: From fridges to motorcycles to EVs … to?
The case is about the continuous entrepreneurial transformation, over two decades, of a company in terms of increasingly advanced technologies and international product markets. It describes how Geely, a leading player in the global automotive industry, started in the 1980s with its founder capitalizing on a series of opportunities during the ti…
By Mark J. Greeven Patrick Reinmoeller Lisa Simone Duke and Wei Wei
©2022
Case Study Strategy Leadership Entrepreneurship Culture Sustainability
Integrate or partner?: An M&A analysis from the acquiree’s point of view
Avaloq, headquartered in Switzerland, is a market leader in global digital banking. It was acquired by the leading Japanese IT conglomerate NEC Corporation at the end of 2020, despite COVID-19 pandemic challenges faced during the sale process. The aim of the M&A was to strengthen NEC’s cloud software services in digital finance and government, e…
By Carlos Cordon Giorgio Carlo Brambilla and Marta Xiangjin Cao
©2022
Case Study Entrepreneurship Leadership Finance
Cyna Pharma: Reaping the rewards of perseverance (B)
The B case describes the events – including the offers and the negotiation – leading up to Sundown’s acquisition of Cyna for US$40.50 per share in cash or US$624 million (approximately C$841 million) – a 120% premium over the closing price of just over US$18 a share before the deal was announced. The case also brings the reader up to date on th…
By Benoit F. Leleux Jennifer Jordan Omar Toulan and Beverley Lennox
©2022
Case Study Entrepreneurship Leadership Finance
Cyna Pharma: Reaping the rewards of perseverance (A)
The A case tells the story of Anthony Giovinazzo’s entrepreneurial journey with Cyna Pharma, which he built from the ground up. Cyna Pharma was a Canada-based specialty pharmaceutical company that was at the point of conducting Phase 3 clinical trials in 2016 for its main product: APL-130277 – a novel delivery mechanism for an existing drug call…
By Benoit F. Leleux Jennifer Jordan Omar Toulan and Beverley Lennox
©2022
Case Study Sustainability Entrepreneurship Growth Marketing Pricing Leadership
Bobsla: E-motion on snow
FULPMES, AUSTRIA, AUGUST 2021. Sergey Ignatyev, the founder and CEO of Bobsla, had arrived in Austria in 2019 from his native Saint Petersburg, attracted to the country by Startup Tirol, a foundation dedicated to bringing top technology startups to Austria. His revolutionary electric vehicle, a hybrid between a snowmobile and a sled on tracks, h…
4th prize in the 2022 John Molson MBA Case Writing Competition
By Benoit F. Leleux
©2022
Bobsla: E-motion on snow
Bobsla: E-motion on snow
By Benoit F. Leleux
©2022
Summary
FULPMES, AUSTRIA, AUGUST 2021. Sergey Ignatyev, the founder and CEO of Bobsla, had arrived in Austria in 2019 from his native Saint Petersburg, attracted to the country by Startup Tirol, a foundation dedicated to bringing top technology startups to Austria. His revolutionary electric vehicle, a hybrid between a snowmobile and a sled on tracks, had already won multiple prestigious technology and innovation awards and was the talk of the town on European slopes. The list of possible uses was growing every day. At the same time, the quest for investors had proved more arduous than expected. The question now was whether he could salvage his startup and finally turn it into the “Tesla on Snow.” Prototypes were making the rounds between exhibitions and technology fairs already, attracting attention and supportive editorials. The thrill of riding an electric snowmobile at 30 km/h sitting only millimeters above the snow was an incomparable and addictive experience. The hard part now was to define a proper business model (Selling hardware? Organizing events? Licensing the patented technology? B2B or B2C? Austria, US or Canada?) and developing a robust business plan to take the Bobsla to the world’s snowy slopes. Every dimension of the plan needed to be internally consistent and sustainable to make the Bobsla the “Tesla on Snow,” the ideal replacement for the snowmobiles craved by nature lovers around the world but which were actually environmental disasters: noisy, polluting and gas guzzling.
4th prize in the 2022 John Molson MBA Case Writing Competition
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Bobsla
Industry Automotive, Electric Vehicles
Language English
Contact

Research Information & Knowledge Hub for additional information on IMD publications

Case Study Sustainability Strategy Entrepreneurship Growth
Plastecowood: A future for plastic trash
The case is about Plastecowood, a company that turns plastic packaging waste into assembly products and sustainable lumber. It was founded by John Northcott in 2012 with the vision of taking a global issue – waste from plastic packaging – and turning it into a business. Two years later, when Plastecowood was struggling with ineffective productio…
By Benoit F. Leleux Alexey Markov Dominik Stock Rashod Nasirov and Wolfgang Illing
©2021
Case Study Sustainability Entrepreneurship Diversity and Equity and Inclusion
Essilor’s Eye Mitra program: Serving BOP markets through inclusive business models
At Essilor, Jayanth Bhuvaraghan, recently retired Chief Mission Officer (CMO), had launched and then promoted an original base-of-pyramid (BOP) operation in India, which recruited, trained and set up some 8,000 Eye Mitras to operate in remote rural communities. These primary vision care providers were able to run vision tests and produce correct…
By Benoit F. Leleux Pallivathukkal Cherian Abraham and Jayanth Bhuvaraghan
©2021
Case Study Finance Entrepreneurship Sustainability Growth Digital
Elite: Affinity financing and smart leases
The case documents the original mattress leasing program initiated by François Pugliese, the owner of premium mattress firm Elite in Etoy (Switzerland). Since the beds he sold targeted the higher end of the market, it quickly dawned on him that customers could be tempted by a leasing offer instead of a standard purchase arrangement. In 2012, Fra…
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2021