Sustainability
Latest Case Studies
Case Study Finance Social Innovation Sustainability
The ICRC (C): The Humanitarian Impact bond, from concept to reality
The last case in the three-part series looks at ICRC’s journey and learnings in putting together the HIB bond. Additionally, it explores how the ICRC built on this first experience to build up its organizational readiness and launch more new financing models.
By Vanina Farber and Shih-Han Huang
©2022
The ICRC (C): The Humanitarian Impact bond, from concept to reality
By Vanina Farber and Shih-Han Huang
©2022
Summary
The last case in the three-part series looks at ICRC’s journey and learnings in putting together the HIB bond. Additionally, it explores how the ICRC built on this first experience to build up its organizational readiness and launch more new financing models.
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization International Committee of the Red Cross
Industry Philanthropy, Non-profit Organizations Management
Language English
Contact

Research Information & Knowledge Hub for additional information on IMD publications

Case Study Finance Social Innovation Sustainability
The ICRC (B): The Humanitarian Impact bond
The ICRC’s Humanitarian Impact bond is based on the social impact bond model, which brings together outcome funders (donors such as governments, foundations and corporations), service providers (NGOs, social enterprises, etc.) and social investors to pay for the delivery of social outcomes through “pay-for-success” agreements. Case B explores th…
By Vanina Farber and Shih-Han Huang
©2022
The ICRC (B): The Humanitarian Impact bond
By Vanina Farber and Shih-Han Huang
©2022
Summary
The ICRC’s Humanitarian Impact bond is based on the social impact bond model, which brings together outcome funders (donors such as governments, foundations and corporations), service providers (NGOs, social enterprises, etc.) and social investors to pay for the delivery of social outcomes through “pay-for-success” agreements. Case B explores the mechanics of the social impact bond model, how it is applied in the HIB case, and the purpose and role of the term sheet in aligning the needs of the different stakeholders and driving a transaction forward.
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization International Committee of the Red Cross
Industry Philanthropy, Non-profit Organizations Management
Language English
Contact

Research Information & Knowledge Hub for additional information on IMD publications

Case Study Finance Social Innovation Sustainability
The ICRC (A): Are your humanitarian solutions investable?
In July 2017, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) launched the world’s first Humanitarian Impact Bond. This innovative finance pilot was an experiment by the ICRC to engage the private sector differently and diversify funding – critical given the widening humanitarian aid gap. It was a massive undertaking. The HIB, which had a ma…
By Vanina Farber and Shih-Han Huang
©2022
The ICRC (A): Are your humanitarian solutions investable?
By Vanina Farber and Shih-Han Huang
©2022
Summary
In July 2017, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) launched the world’s first Humanitarian Impact Bond. This innovative finance pilot was an experiment by the ICRC to engage the private sector differently and diversify funding – critical given the widening humanitarian aid gap. It was a massive undertaking. The HIB, which had a maximum potential deal size of CHF 26 million, took over four years to plan and multiple stakeholders, including governments, foundations, investors and lawyers, to put together. How did the ICRC pull this off and what possibilities does innovative finance offer the humanitarian and private sectors? Case A focuses on the background of the ICRC and the factors driving the humanitarian sector to innovate and engage the private sector in a new way. Furthermore, it explores a critical question – what makes a humanitarian project investable?
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization International Committee of the Red Cross
Industry Philanthropy, Non-profit Organizations Management
Language English
Contact

Research Information & Knowledge Hub for additional information on IMD publications

Case Study Sustainability Entrepreneurship
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles (Abridged, French translation)
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deep…
3rd prize in the 2022 HEC CSR Challenge case writing competition
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles (Abridged, French translation)
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Summary
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deeply rooted values, shared with many in the valley. Opaline was her experiment to prove to the world that a different type of capitalism was possible, one that put human and environmental aspects where they belonged – at the epicenter of a business revolution. De Meyer had regularly been asked in interviews why Opaline was not trying to grow faster, rather than ensuring that its existing suppliers and distributors developed alongside the company. She always replied by drawing an analogy with a growing forest, in which no tree stood much higher than the others or else it would fall, alone, with the next storm. The analogy proved robust but now a more violent storm – a global pandemic – was brewing that was hurting everyone at once. What would it mean for all the projects the team had set out for 2020? And more fundamentally, could Opaline weather this storm as it had already done several times thanks to its strong ecosystem of partners? Would it pay the price for not having extended its roots deep enough when it could?
3rd prize in the 2022 HEC CSR Challenge case writing competition
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Opaline
Industry Consumer Goods, Food and Beverage
Language French
Contact

Research Information & Knowledge Hub for additional information on IMD publications

Case Study Sustainability Entrepreneurship
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles (Abridged)
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deep…
3rd prize in the 2022 HEC CSR Challenge case writing competition
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles (Abridged)
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Summary
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deeply rooted values, shared with many in the valley. Opaline was her experiment to prove to the world that a different type of capitalism was possible, one that put human and environmental aspects where they belonged – at the epicenter of a business revolution. De Meyer had regularly been asked in interviews why Opaline was not trying to grow faster, rather than ensuring that its existing suppliers and distributors developed alongside the company. She always replied by drawing an analogy with a growing forest, in which no tree stood much higher than the others or else it would fall, alone, with the next storm. The analogy proved robust but now a more violent storm – a global pandemic – was brewing that was hurting everyone at once. What would it mean for all the projects the team had set out for 2020? And more fundamentally, could Opaline weather this storm as it had already done several times thanks to its strong ecosystem of partners? Would it pay the price for not having extended its roots deep enough when it could?
3rd prize in the 2022 HEC CSR Challenge case writing competition
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Opaline
Industry Consumer Goods, Food and Beverage
Language English
Contact

Research Information & Knowledge Hub for additional information on IMD publications

Case Study Sustainability Entrepreneurship
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deep…
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Values-based entrepreneurship: Opaline’s bubbles
By Benoit F. Leleux and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Summary
Orsières (Valais, Switzerland) April 2020. Opaline, an original juice production company with high social and environmental standards had begun in 2010. It took founder Sofia de Meyer over 10 years to build a responsible and impactful company aligned with her own aspirations, not just a lifestyle venture but one that would capitalize on her deeply rooted values, shared with many in the valley. Opaline was her experiment to prove to the world that a different type of capitalism was possible, one that put human and environmental aspects where they belonged – at the epicenter of a business revolution. De Meyer had regularly been asked in interviews why Opaline was not trying to grow faster, rather than ensuring that its existing suppliers and distributors developed alongside the company. She always replied by drawing an analogy with a growing forest, in which no tree stood much higher than the others or else it would fall, alone, with the next storm. The analogy proved robust but now a more violent storm – a global pandemic – was brewing that was hurting everyone at once. What would it mean for all the projects the team had set out for 2020? And more fundamentally, could Opaline weather this storm as it had already done several times thanks to its strong ecosystem of partners? Would it pay the price for not having extended its roots deep enough when it could?
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Opaline
Industry Consumer Goods, Food and Beverage
Language English
Contact

Research Information & Knowledge Hub for additional information on IMD publications

Case Study Digital Global Business Operations Sustainability
Henkel: Driving sustainability through digital
Henkel, a 145-year-old family business, had unintentionally started its digital transformation journey in 2013. Only a few years later it had reached such a level of digital maturity that digital became a decisive element of the company’s strategic framework and one of the key drivers to achieve growth. In less than ten years, Henkel received in…
By Carlos Cordon and Edwin Wellian
©2022
Henkel: Driving sustainability through digital
By Carlos Cordon and Edwin Wellian
©2022
Summary
Henkel, a 145-year-old family business, had unintentionally started its digital transformation journey in 2013. Only a few years later it had reached such a level of digital maturity that digital became a decisive element of the company’s strategic framework and one of the key drivers to achieve growth. In less than ten years, Henkel received international recognition as a global leader in using Industry 4.0 technologies to transform factories, value chains and business models. The first part looks at how this journey started, what it had to do to reach this impressive level of digital competence and to make the journey self-sustaining. Can Henkel also build on the success of this digital transformation to make its products carbon-neutral during production and consumption? This is the question that will be explored during the second part. Henkel had made good progress to reduce its own operational CO2 emissions, but realized that this represented less than 5% of the total. Two-thirds occurred during consumption and one-third during the production of raw materials. Making a 50,000+ workforce and operations digitally savvy is one thing, but reducing carbon-emissions at stages of the process over which Henkel had no direct control is something else. The dilemma facing Henkel was where it should focus on to reduce its overall CO2 emissions. Should it continue to prioritize making its own production sites carbon-free, in the knowledge that this represents only a fraction of the total emissions, or should it prioritize making its products carbon-free in the other parts of the value chain where the impact on our planet is higher? Prioritizing the latter would make sense, but what could Henkel actually do to change the attitudes and behaviors of thousands of suppliers and hundreds of millions of consumers?
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Henkel
Industry Consumer Goods;Manufacturing, Chemicals
Language English
Contact

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Case Study Sustainability Diversity and Equity and Inclusion
OCP: Liberating energy to create sustainable growth
The case focuses on the transformation of OCP, a state-owned monopoly that mined and exploited Morocco’s phosphate reserves. By 2021 it had become an organization with a mission to contribute to the sustainability of food security as the custodians of 70% of the world’s phosphate reserves. Phosphate is one of three vital ingredients in fertilize…
Case Study Digital Disruption Human Resources Sustainability
Automobili Lamborghini: Future-proofing an iconic luxury brand
Throughout its 60-year history, luxury carmaker Lamborghini had been consistently visionary, innovative and inspiring. Bold entrepreneurial moves – such as bringing the attributes of a racing car to mainstream, non-racing vehicles, or pioneering a luxury SUV – became an intrinsic part of the company’s DNA. Yet, entering the 2020s, the unfolding …
By Stéphane J. G. Girod and Martin Králik
©2022
Automobili Lamborghini: Future-proofing an iconic luxury brand
By Stéphane J. G. Girod and Martin Králik
©2022
Summary
Throughout its 60-year history, luxury carmaker Lamborghini had been consistently visionary, innovative and inspiring. Bold entrepreneurial moves – such as bringing the attributes of a racing car to mainstream, non-racing vehicles, or pioneering a luxury SUV – became an intrinsic part of the company’s DNA. Yet, entering the 2020s, the unfolding social, geopolitical, environmental and industrial transitions presented luxury players, including auto companies, with monumental challenges. Sustainability – and, in the car sector, electrification – came to define the new decade. In an effort to push for net-zero climate-change targets, between 2021 and 2022 EU legislators announced a virtual ban on the sale of traditional combustion engines past the year 2035. Future-proofing the organization for the challenges ahead required (i) reinventing the iconic brand so that it remained desirable in what will be a radically different automotive space, based on sustainability targets, new materials, and digital technologies; (ii) shifting the workforce composition and culture from one that was firmly rooted in engineering, precision, and a parochial, heads-down, male-dominated outlook to one that emphasized cross-functionality, diversity of backgrounds, curiosity, hyperawareness, and shared organizational and social values; and (iii) maintaining a position of thought, industry, technological and innovation leadership, alongside the timeless quality of the made-in-Italy label, at a time when customers as well as society at large are looking to global brands to come up with a renewed, compelling vision of purposeful luxury.
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Automobili Lamborghini
Industry Consumer Goods, Luxury Goods and Jewelery;Automotive, Automobiles;Automotive
Language English
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Case Study Family Business Sustainability Strategy Diversity and Equity and Inclusion
Firmenich: Juggling the short and the long term
Formatted like a comic-strip, this case showcases how Firmenich achieved resilience and strong sustainability commitments thanks to its family ownership. The case investigates how family ownership spanning across four generations and 125 years, has influenced the company’s core values and brought a long-term perspective to its strategy, which al…
By Sameh Abadir and Marta Widz
©2022
Firmenich: Juggling the short and the long term
By Sameh Abadir and Marta Widz
©2022
Summary
Formatted like a comic-strip, this case showcases how Firmenich achieved resilience and strong sustainability commitments thanks to its family ownership. The case investigates how family ownership spanning across four generations and 125 years, has influenced the company’s core values and brought a long-term perspective to its strategy, which allowed sustainability, diversity, and inclusion on the executives’ agenda many decades before its peers. The case concludes by illustrating how these core foundational values allowed Firmenich to weather the COVID-19 storm by prompting the organization to react very rapidly, in a display of strong resilience. Firmenich is the winner of the 2019 IMD-Pictet Sustainability in Family Business Award.
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Firmenich
Industry Consumer Goods, Cosmetics and Perfumes;Consumer Goods, Food and Beverage
Language English
Contact

Research Information & Knowledge Hub for additional information on IMD publications

Case Study Sustainability Family Business Strategy
The VELUX Group: The path to lifetime carbon neutrality
The case explores how the family-owned VELUX Group – inventor and manufacturer of roof windows since 1941 – took incorporating sustainability in its business operations to heart, leading to its pledge to become lifetime carbon neutral by its centenary in 2041. In its early days and at the behest of its founder, the VELUX Group adopted its “Mod…
By Sameh Abadir and Marc Chauvet
©2022
The VELUX Group: The path to lifetime carbon neutrality
By Sameh Abadir and Marc Chauvet
©2022
Summary
The case explores how the family-owned VELUX Group – inventor and manufacturer of roof windows since 1941 – took incorporating sustainability in its business operations to heart, leading to its pledge to become lifetime carbon neutral by its centenary in 2041. In its early days and at the behest of its founder, the VELUX Group adopted its “Model Company Objective (MCO),” a charter for how the business should be run. The case illustrates how the MCO set the company on a course toward sustainable operations, allowing it to spearhead such efforts in an industry often reluctant to engage with the topic.
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization VELUX
Industry Manufacturing
Language English
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Case Study Organizational Behavior Social Innovation Strategy General Management Leadership Diversity and Equity and Inclusion Sustainability
Allianz Africa: We secure your future
The case and video focus on Delphine Traoré as she takes over as CEO of Allianz Africa, in November 2021. The written case and video explore the external and internal challenges she and Allianz Africa face. The challenges are especially interesting because of the completely different view of insurance that exists in Africa and because Delphine p…
By Robert Hooijberg and Nancy Lane
©2022
Allianz Africa: We secure your future
By Robert Hooijberg and Nancy Lane
©2022
Summary
The case and video focus on Delphine Traoré as she takes over as CEO of Allianz Africa, in November 2021. The written case and video explore the external and internal challenges she and Allianz Africa face. The challenges are especially interesting because of the completely different view of insurance that exists in Africa and because Delphine pursues a purpose beyond just improving the business. This exposure to the African perspective and Delphine’s leadership allows participants both to challenge their business assumptions and reflect on their own purpose.
Copyright ©2022
Copyright owner IMD Copyright
Organization Allianz Africa
Industry Finance and Insurance, Insurance
Language English
Contact

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Case Study Digital Disruption Entrepreneurship Strategy Start-up Advertising Social Media Sustainability
Largo.ai in Hollywood: Good enough?
The case tells the story of Sami Arpa a young entrepreneur with a passion for the movie industry. Sami Arpa and his start-up Largo leverage technology to improve the movie industry. Largo launched in 2018 with the platform for short films called Sofy.tv. In 2020 Largo launches its own SaaS B2B platform providing an AI algorithm for the film-maki…
By Jim Pulcrano Laure Frank Désirée Gilgen Konrad Meyer and Federico Paparella
©2022
Case Study Strategy Sustainability Human Resources
Ternium: Rolling into the future – human resources
Ternium is a Latin American steel company that has earned a reputation as one of the best-managed steel companies in the world, skilled in navigating turbulent markets. Driving the company are a long-term strategic focus, an engineer’s mindset of constant process innovation as old as its roots, and a goal to become the leading steel company in t…
By Omar Toulan and Shih-Han Huang
©2022
Case Study Strategy Sustainability Human Resources
Ternium: Rolling into the future – sustainability
Ternium is a Latin American steel company that has earned a reputation as one of the best-managed steel companies in the world, skilled in navigating turbulent markets. Driving the company are a long-term strategic focus, an engineer’s mindset of constant process innovation as old as its roots, and a goal to become the leading steel company in t…
By Omar Toulan and Shih-Han Huang
©2022